Increasing Emotional Intelligence In the Workplace

In today’s job market, every advantage matters.  A strong resume and relevant answers to interview questions will go a long way. Though, it will ultimately come down to making your interviewer feel comfortable that you can perform the job at a high level.

That entails being able to interview with emotional intelligence.  In this article, we’ll discuss how to implement basic emotional intelligence theories in order to better interview for a sales or marketing job.

The Core Four

There are 4 skills that, when consistently practiced, lead to well-rounded Emotional Intelligence.

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Self Awareness

A straightforward, honest and objective understanding of how you work.  It is knowing what motivates and satisfies you, as well as what pushes your buttons.

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Self Management

Using your awareness to direct your behavior positively and putting aside your immediate needs to focus on long-term goals.

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Social Awareness

The ability to recognize emotions in other people and understand what is really going on in situations in an objective manner.

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Relationship Management

Using your awareness to manage your interactions, from moment to moment and over an extended period of time.

Self-Awareness at Work

A straightforward, honest and objective understanding of how you work.  It is knowing what motivates and satisfies you, as well as what pushes your buttons.

Don’t Be Fooled by a Bad Mood

Simply, don’t let frustration or anger dictate your actions.  (e.g., if a sales call goes poorly, you do not let it affect your next one).

Get to Know Yourself Under Stress

When you are balancing hectic days, you always try to see how you can get the most done with the time you have left in your day.  We don’t rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to the level of our training.

Don’t Be Fooled by a Good Mood, Either

Don’t let happiness or overwhelming joy dictate your actions. (e.g., if you just closed a deal, you stay grounded and do not jump to impulsive decisions in your next meeting).

Self-Management at Work

Using your awareness to direct your behavior positively and putting aside your immediate needs to focus on long-term goals.

Smile and Laugh More

Smiling and laughter release serotonin, the chemical that causes happiness.  If you make a regular effort to let yourself smile and laugh, you will have a more positive approach to your day.

Take Control of Your Self-Talk

Your internal monologue is powerful.  Because of this, it can be helpful to be aware of your thoughts.  If you sense a negative trend, you can work to stop it.

It may be helpful to mention to your interviewer that you always strive to keep a positive attitude. In doing so, your goal is not to be ignorantly optimistic, but to be self-confident and focus on consistently making progress and solving problems.

Visualize Yourself Succeeding

Seeing is believing.  Before you step into your interview room, try to briefly picture yourself afterwards once everything has gone well.  Of course, be prepared for potential hiccups along the way, but always keep that image of you succeeding in your mind.

Focus Your Attention on Your Freedoms, Rather than Your Limitations

When trying to overcome a difficult situation, it is easy to obsess over what you aren’t able to do.  While easy, it is not particularly helpful.

In order to get your desired outcome, you should focus on what you can do well. For example, maybe you are able to build rapport with people quickly but struggle with technical knowledge.  If that is the case, focus your energy on building those strong relationships.

Social-Awareness at Work

The ability to recognize emotions in other people and understand what is really going on in situations in an objective manner.

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Greet People by Name

In the early stages of building a relationship, you lead with a person’s name when you start a conversation.

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Live in the Moment

In this over-connected world, it’s easy to spend most of your day worrying about what you should have done, or what you still need to do.  While it can be helpful to reflect on the past and plan for the future, it is most important to be present in your interactions.

Give the interviewer your full attention. Focus on giving thoughtful answers to their questions an building a  relationship with them.

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Watch Body Language

When possible, try to observe how an interviewer’s mannerisms line up with their words and tone of voice.  Physical cues to their mood can often tell you more than what they are actually saying.

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Catch the Mood of the Room

You always try to get a sense of the “feeling” in the room without directly asking.

Relationship Management at Work

Using your awareness to manage your interactions, from moment to moment and over an extended period of time.

Explain Your Decisions, Don’t Just Make Them

Everyone in your world of work likes to have some sense of control.  Instead of simply acting, offer a brief explanation as to why you are taking that action.  It will allow the person to feel involved in the process and help accomplish your short term goal while strengthening your relationship.

When You Care, Show It

When you are speaking with a future employer, it may benefit you to be polite & genuine in your tone and helpful in your actions.  It will go a long way toward building a strong, effective relationship.