Proving Your Value

From Past Job Experiences

Important Considerations

Employers will heavily scrutinize the drivers behind job changes in hopes of determining an applicant’s potential longevity, their ability to succeed, or both.

This can put job seekers in a precarious situation. They want to be honest, yet at the same time, it’s important that they don’t make themselves look unreliable, incompetent, or unproductive.

Below, we give some advice on how to describe the reasoning behind your job changes without being dishonest or painting yourself in a bad light.

Overall Tips

1. Keep Past Jobs Relevant

Longevity is a concern of every employer, especially these days.  It may be worthwhile to mention that you’re looking for a company that can provide a platform of successful growth which, from your research, you perceive the organization to do that.

Discuss how your current field is your passion and expertise, therefore it’s only logical that you stay in it.
It may be helpful to say that while you have x number of years of experience in the relevant aspects, you always find that one of the best competitive advantages is a consistent learning.

2. What You’re Looking for In a Role

Address the relevancy of your past jobs / current positions to what the employer is looking for.  In this case, it would be advantageous to discuss how you would manage projects in a manner that ensures the customer:

  • Feels they are taken care of
  • Makes the process predictable
  • Ensures that the client leaves satisfied
  • Ensures margins remain intact

3 Items to Include

1. Explain your previous company in 1-2 sentences. Keep it simple.

  • “On an overarching basis, the firm specialized in ____”
  • “My company, ____, oversaw”
  • “____ was responsible for”

2. Discuss what your role was.

  • Focus on the parts of your past job that are relevant. You don’t want to discuss marketing at your past job if you are interviewing for a director level job.
  • “I was recruited for my ability to bring on new business. Ultimately, the challenge when I got there was this strategy was selling into ___, and they’ve had trouble with that in the past…..”

3. Discuss what made you successful.

  • “I stopped treating clients like a walking dollar bill…And I made sure to know more about the technology than other people, so that I could best help them.”
  • “I kept up with the changing marketplace…so I knew what I was up against, but I was always most concerned with the client.” ie. I was obsessed with great customer service.

Drawing Parallels Between Past and Current Positions

Because maintaining relevancy is crucial to your ability to impress an interviewer, the following is a list of topics that are worth discussing in order to draw parallels between past and current positions.

  • The product or service you sold/the complexity of the sales cycle
  • The length of the sales cycle
  • Who you sold to in organizations
  • What size companies you sold into
  • The digital marketing strategy
  • The personalities of the target market
  • The amount per sale
  • The size of the company you’ve worked at
  • Any sales training you’ve had
"career services"

SEE HOW EMPLOYERS THINK

See real application, negotiation, thank you’s and follow-ups written by competing job seekers. Use these to up the persuasiveness of what you write.

SEE HOW EMPLOYERS THINK

See real application, negotiation, thank you’s and follow-ups written by competing job seekers. Use these to up the persuasiveness of what you write.

SEE HOW EMPLOYERS THINK

See real application, negotiation, thank you’s and follow-ups written by competing job seekers. Use these to up the persuasiveness of what you write.

Much More Than Interviewing Help 

IS is much more than interviewing and job search content. If you continue to study the theories and strategies interleaved throughout IJS, you will get the job you want.  But, the unique theories will allow you to achieve significantly more than your peers from day one.